Fuck Yeah Liz Prince!

All things Liz Prince - the Ignatz award winning comic book writer hailing from Massachusetts! This is a fan-run tumblr. Please check out the 'links' section for her personal page!
oddree13:

Got the chance to add another book to my Liz Prince collection.

oddree13:

Got the chance to add another book to my Liz Prince collection.

nicolejgeorges:

I just flew back from SPX and boy are my arms tired.  Shown here with Liz Prince, who sold out of Tomboy on day one!

nicolejgeorges:

I just flew back from SPX and boy are my arms tired.
Shown here with Liz Prince, who sold out of Tomboy on day one!

pwplsteens:

It’s time for one of our favorite activities of the week— looking at all the new titles coming to PWPLS! Here are a few of the books you’ll be seeing on our shelves soon:

Dead Zone by Robison Wells

It began with a virus. Then a series of attacks erupted across the nation. Now America is at war—and a handful of teens with impossible powers are its only defense.

In Dead Zone, Robison Wells delivers his most nail-bitingly tense read yet—and an electrifying conclusion to a two-book series that’s perfect for fans of The Maze Runner and I Am Number Four.

Exquisite Captive by Heather Demetrios

Nalia is a jinni of tremendous ancient power, the only survivor of a coup that killed nearly everyone she loved. Now in hiding on the dark caravan—the lucrative jinni slave trade between Arjinna and Earth, where jinn are forced to grant wishes and obey their human masters’ every command—she’d give almost anything to be free of the golden shackles that bind her to Malek, her handsome, cruel master, and his lavish Hollywood lifestyle. Enter Raif, the enigmatic leader of Arjinna’s revolution and Nalia’s sworn enemy. He promises to release Nalia from her master so that she can return to her ravaged homeland and free her imprisoned brother. There’s just one catch: for Raif’s unbinding magic to work, Nalia must gain possession of her bottle … and convince the dangerously persuasive Malek that she truly loves him.

Read More

nayughrabbit:

Story of my life, Liz is more relatable than her teen-self knows. Tomboy is a great book you guys, go get it.

nayughrabbit:

Story of my life, Liz is more relatable than her teen-self knows. Tomboy is a great book you guys, go get it.

wearetatal:

Did you know that SPX (Small Press Expo) is in Bethesda this weekend? If you’re a comic book or graphic novel lover, you may want to check it out! To get in to the spirit of SPX, Librarian M is here is a brand new memoir: 

Tomboy by Liz Prince

Liz knew from an early age that she did not like to wear dresses—in fact, she felt most comfortable wearing boys’ clothing. Unfortunately, her peers did not feel comfortable about her wearing boys’ clothing and Liz spent her adolescence being bullied for her appearance and trying to find a group of people who accepted her without her needing to change.

That all sounds kind of dire, and some parts of this memoir are sad and anger-inducing, but it is also very funny and satisfying when Liz does find someone to connect with. I recommend this book for anyone who has ever felt like an outcast for any reason.

wearetatal:

Did you know that SPX (Small Press Expo) is in Bethesda this weekend? If you’re a comic book or graphic novel lover, you may want to check it out! To get in to the spirit of SPX, Librarian M is here is a brand new memoir:
Tomboy by Liz Prince
Liz knew from an early age that she did not like to wear dresses—in fact, she felt most comfortable wearing boys’ clothing. Unfortunately, her peers did not feel comfortable about her wearing boys’ clothing and Liz spent her adolescence being bullied for her appearance and trying to find a group of people who accepted her without her needing to change.
That all sounds kind of dire, and some parts of this memoir are sad and anger-inducing, but it is also very funny and satisfying when Liz does find someone to connect with. I recommend this book for anyone who has ever felt like an outcast for any reason.
theabsolutemag:

Defy Traditional Feminine Stereotypes With Liz Prince’s “Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir”

Liz Prince’s graphic novel Tomboy is a poignant yet witty recollection of the trials and tribulations of one young woman’s struggles against traditional feminine stereotypes.

Readers meet the narrator as she’s about to enter middle school. Liz is a tomboy through and through, yet her guy friends don’t want to hang out with her any more. To make matters worse, her female friends are more interested in joining a cheerleading squad and swapping makeup tips than they are in playing video games with poor Liz. As the years pass and our heroine enters high school, Liz struggles with being an outsider and winds up joining a volunteer project where she starts learning about Feminism and girl culture, which ultimately helps her boost her self-esteem.

theabsolutemag:

Defy Traditional Feminine Stereotypes With Liz Prince’s “Tomboy: A Graphic Memoir”

Liz Prince’s graphic novel Tomboy is a poignant yet witty recollection of the trials and tribulations of one young woman’s struggles against traditional feminine stereotypes.

Readers meet the narrator as she’s about to enter middle school. Liz is a tomboy through and through, yet her guy friends don’t want to hang out with her any more. To make matters worse, her female friends are more interested in joining a cheerleading squad and swapping makeup tips than they are in playing video games with poor Liz. As the years pass and our heroine enters high school, Liz struggles with being an outsider and winds up joining a volunteer project where she starts learning about Feminism and girl culture, which ultimately helps her boost her self-esteem.